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As a linguist, meeting a native speaker of a language you’re studying is a pretty exciting event. Maybe it’s just me, but I find that I often have to do a delicate balancing act between “I’m a freakish nerd of your language, which probably implies I want to be one of you, since I’m clearly not from your ethno-cultural group” and “I know nothing and have a general interest in your language.” If I don’t start with a “power introduction” (wherein I detail my research interests and years of experience with their language), I get the slow-and-loud reception. “how. are. YOU. doing?” Thanks, mate. I’m gonna go over here now.

勉強している言語の母国語話者に会えることは言語学者の私には幸いな行いだ。私だけの意見かもしれないが、そういう場合に、よく、「明らかにあなたと同じ民族人種じゃなくてもあたなの国語オタク」と「全く何も経験したこともないが何故かあたなの文化に興味がある初学者」という二つ極度に見られないように自己紹介しなければならない。強い第一印象で始まらなかったら、遅くて大声の反応をやってくる。「オ・ゲ・ン・キ・デ・ス・カ?」って。いいんだよ、別に。こっちに行くから。

On the other hand, if I start off too strong, my interlocutor won’t be able to relate. After all, what’re the odds that a language learner is also a linguist? So I have to carefully reign it in, to something that the general language learner/speaker can relate to, while still covertly inducting them into certain linguistic aspects.

一方、強すぎて始まったら、我が聞き手はもう愛想できなくなる。だって、語学する者の中に、何割は言語学者?だからといって、そんなに深い言語学論に踏まずに、微かにある言語学点に紹介しならが聞き手も解りやすい話題で始まります。

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Glossary

COCA - Corpus of Contemporary American English
L1/L2/... - Primary/Secondary Language
NNS - Non-Native Speaker
NS - Native Speaker