1. I am a Canadian-born Chinese, who grew up speaking English at school; and Chinese at home.
    私は学校で英語を、家で中国語を話す中華系カナダ人である。
  2. I am a linguistics student with a reasonable command of Japanese.
    私は日本語が結構できる言語学を勉強する生徒である。

When the preceding two facts about myself are learned by my interlocutors, I often get asked what the difference between the three languages are: Chinese, Japanese, and English. They will often go straight to the basic syntax, and assume that’s all there is to discuss. But if one would consult the table below, such an analysis is not so simple.
この僕に関する二つ事実を知ったら、我が聞き手はよく「英語、中国語、と日本語の違いはなんですか?」を僕に聞きます。そして、構文論だけで比べて、それ以上は考えません。だけど、下のテーブルに調べたら、例の三ヶ国語の相違はそんなに簡単に解析できないでしょう。

中国語(Ch) 日本語(Jp) 英語(En) Outlier
(例外)
Struc.
(構造)
Ex. (例) Struc.
(構造)
Ex. (例) Struc.
(構造)
Ex. (例)
Syntax
基本的構文
[S]VO 我愛你 [S]OV [私が]貴方を愛する SVO I love you 日(Jp)
Topic Prominence
主題突出
Y (有) 這裡很暑 Y (有) ここは暑い N (無) *Here is hot;
It’s hot (in) here
英(En)
Wh-clause
形容詞節
pre-
(前)
我是個喜歡花的 pre-
(前)
[私は]花が好きな post-
(後)
I’m a person who likes flowers 英(En)
Verb Conj.
動詞活用
N (無) 是、
我是、
他是、
你是
Y (有) である、
です、
でした
Y (有) be,
am,
is,
were
中(Ch)
Counters
数え方
Y (有) 一個、二個、…
一頭、二頭、…
一匹、二匹、…
Y (有) 一つ、二つ、…
一羽、二羽、…
一台、二台、…
very rare
非常に珍しい
a slice of bread, two slices … 英(En)
Adj. Conj.
形容詞活用
N (無) 青色 Y (有) 青い、青かった、青く N (無) blue, [was] blue 日(Jp)
Passive voice
受身形
N (無) 我愛他
*我被他愛
Y (有) 愛する
愛される
Y (有) I love
I am loved
中(Ch)
Tone
声調
Y (有) 媽(1)、麻(2)、馬(3)、罵(4) Sort of (半) 端、橋、箸 N (無) you HATE the game!
you hate the GAME?
英(En)
 Pronouns
代名詞
Y (有) 我、你、他 Sort of (半) 私、あなた、彼 Y (有) I, you, he, she 日(Jp)

The above table is by no means an exhaustive comparison, but I hope it sheds a little more light on some of the defining features of Chinese, Japanese, and English. Of the nine categories illustrated, there’s almost an even distribution of differences (essentially implying that all three are equally distinct). Let us now consider some of the more curious aspects of the three languages.
これは一応、徹底的な比較ではないけど、少なくとも中国語と日本語と英語の特定の部分を表れるでしょう。上に表れている九つ範疇をご覧の通り、三ヶ国語は同じぐらい相違にみえるでしょう――っていうことはどんな言語であっても、他の二つ言語ともっと近かないでしょう。では、もっと詳しくして見ましょう。

Topic Prominence ・主題突出
Unlike English, both Chinese and Japanese distinct between topics and subjects. The details of such a distinction is well beyond the scope of this post, but basically, things such as adverbial phrases and objects can be moved to the head of the sentence without becoming the subject, as illustrated in the asterisked English example “here is hot”. Instead, it requires the semantically empty pronoun to stand in: “it is hot [in] here”.
英語と違って、中国語と日本語は主語と主題を相違します。詳しくはこのブログの範囲外だけど、簡単に言えば副詞や目的語が主語に成らずに文頭に置かれます。英語の例文の通り、主題はないから、「here is hot」は合っていない。その代わりに、意味的に空虚な代名詞を入れ代わって、「it’s hot [in] here」しか言えないでしょう。

Basic Syntax ・基本的構文
Although Japanese is listed as the exception for basic SVO/SOV syntax, it could be argued that English is the exception among the given three languages. True, Japanese is the only one here that has the object of the verb precede the verb, but both Chinese and Japanese do not oblige a subject. This is aided by the previous fact that both Chinese and Japanese allow for topics (that can syntactically replace the subject), but even without a topic, both languages allow verb-object pairings to stand alone as full sentences.
日本語の目的語が動詞前におけるのでテーブルに例外と書かれましたが、むしろ、英語も例外と思われる。確かに、中国語と英語の目的語は動詞後におけるけど、中国語と日本語は主語が必要ではない。それに、上記に書かれた通り、主題が統語論的に主語を代われるし、主題や主語がなくても、動詞と目的語だけで、日本語と中国語は文法的に許されている。

Wh-clauses ・形容詞句
Simply put, clausal modifiers to noun phrases precede the noun in Chinese and Japanese, but follow the noun phrase in English, as the single- and double-underlines indicate in the above table. Incidentally, in none of the languages is this order mutable: “I am a liking-flowers person” is not considered acceptable; likewise 「私は人、彼 花が好きなの」 is not acceptable.
簡単に言えば、上記のテーブルに下線や両下線した通り、節の修飾語は日本語と中国語で名詞句の前におけますが、英語では名詞句の後におけるんだ。ちなみに、どっちの国語であっても、逆に並べません。「I am a liking-flowers person」は合ってないし、「私は人、彼 花が好きなの」は不自然。

Verb Conjugation ・動詞活用
As an “isolating language,” Chinese does not have verb conjugations, whether for tense, person, or aspect. Japanese does not conjugate for person and number the way that English does; but it does conjugate for aspect and voice in a way that English does periphrastically. Instead, Chinese relies on external tense particles or contextual cues to indicate person, number, or aspect.
「孤立語」(こりつご)として、中国語は人称や数、時制やアスペクトを動詞活用できない。日本語も人称や数の動詞活用はないけど、様態とアスペクトはちゃんと動詞で活用して、英語は迂言法(うげんほう)でアスペクトや様態を表れられます。むしろ、中国語は時制助詞や文脈な手がかりを用いて、人称や数やアスペクトを表れます。

Counters ・数え方
Only in the extremely rare case of uncountable-yet-quantifiable nouns, does English allow counters. Otherwise, the nouns get counted directly, owing to English nouns’ ability to pluralize. The exceptions therefore, are only in historically embedded phrases, that in some cases are already disappearing: bread is counted in loaves or slices (but never “one bread; two bread”); and coffee and water used to be measured in cups or glasses, but is increasingly becoming more countable “would you like a coffe/water?”. On the other hand, Japanese and Chinese have extremely rich sets of counters to quantify the myriad types of nouns: small mammals versus insects, versus large animals, versus machines; all different sorts of objects get intuitively classified in different ways, and get assigned their own counter. Thus, instead of “three cats”; they say something like “three animals of cat”, since “cat” isn’t countable in Japanese or Chinese.
非常な場合を除いて、英語は数え方がない。英語の一般的の名詞は単数形と複数形ができますから、直接にかぞえます。複数形のない英語名詞はコーヒーや水やパンぐらいしかないでしょう。だから、パンは英語でも一枚、二枚で数えて、水やコーヒーは一杯、二杯で数えますが、近頃ますます複数形に出来るようになっていて、若者が「二コーヒーをお願いします」みたいな注文します。一方、中国語と日本語の名詞は複数形がないので、数え方は必要になって、子猫は「三猫」じゃなくて、「猫が三匹」で、大きい動物は一頭、二頭で、携帯は一台、二台で、等々あります。

Adjectival Inflection ・形容詞活用
In this instance, Japanese is easily the exception; neither Chinese nor English inflect for tense in their adjectives. However, unlike Chinese, English can directly modify the adjective by making it the complement of a copula. Thus, we can phrase things like “the book was blue (but perhaps no longer)”; but like for voice and aspect, Chinese uses periphrastic constructions to to indicate the preterite nature of the colour, such as 「此本書本来是藍色的」(This book is originally blue).
この場合は、日本語は例外ですね。英語も中国語も形容詞の活用ができないから。でも、中国語と違って、英語は述語として形容詞を過去形に表れる。例えば、「本は青いでした(でも今はもう青くないかも)」みたいな構造ができますが、中国語は動詞活用と同じくて、迂言法でしか過去形を表れられないでしょう。で、「此本書本来是藍色的」(この本は元々青いです)みたいな構造ができる。

Chinese Passive Voice ・中国語で受身形
Chinese does not technically have a passive voice the way that Japanese and English does, but it does employ a curious construction that syntactically mimics the passive voice:
中国語は日本語と英語みたいに厳密な意味で受身形がないけど、構文的に受身形に似ている構造式がある。

“I was hit by him”

wo3

bei4

ta1

da3

le5
sub/patient
主語・被動者
coverb
副動詞
obj/agent
目的語・動作主
verb
動詞
past particle
過去助詞
I by he hit (PP)

As can be seen in the small break-down table, the so-called bei-construction syntactically resembles the passive construct, wherein the patient (that suffers the verb) precedes the agent (the “doer”). However, two important aspects of the bei-construction invalidate it from being properly considered a true passive voice: (1) the bei-constructions are implicitly pejorative; and (2) the bei-constructions cannot occur with abstract/emotional verbs.
ご覧の通り、いわゆる「被構造」は受身形みたいに被動者の主語が動作主の目的語の前に表れる。だがしかし、受身形は被構造に比べたら、二つ重大な相違があるんだ。(1)被構造は受身形と違って、悪い意味しか使えられない。(2)被構造は抽象的な感情的な動詞で使えない。

Like in English and Japanese, the agent can also be dropped in the Chinese bei-construction. However, even without the agent, there is an implicit perjorative value contained within the structure. Using the bei-construction, “my book was read by millions” implies that it shouldn’t have been read at all. Moreover, as mentioned above, verbs like “love” and “admire” cannot be employed by the bei-construction.
英語と日本語は同じくて、中国語も被構造に動作主をドロップできますが、本当の受身形と違って、嫌な意味を含んでいます。被構造を使って、「私の本は数人に読まれた」は「全然読まれなかった方はいい」っていう意味を含んでいます。それに、「愛する」や「憧れる」の動詞は中国語の被構造を使ったら、非文法になる。

Tone ・声調
Perhaps one of the most famously difficult aspects to master for non-native speakers, Mandarin Chinese employs four tones. While all languages contain speech contours, the difference between tonal and intonal languages is in whether specific phonemes change meaning by a higher/lower/rising/falling pitch. Thus, as in the example in the table, a falling tone (fourth) /ma/ means “scold”; while a flat low tone (third) /ma/ means “horse”. Japanese is perhaps more aptly classified as a semi-tone language; as it uses tonal aspects to mark distinctions between homophones; but these tones are similar to the way that accent is employed in English to distinct homophonous phrases (such as “red COAT” – red-coloured coat versus “RED coat” – 19th-century British soldier).
一番有名な部分かもしれないけど、北京語中国語は四つ声調が用いる。全ての言語は音声輪郭があるんだけど、声調と非声調の相違は一言で音を変わったら、意味も変わるかどうかの相違である。で、中国語の/ma/で、平ら低い音なら、馬のことだけど、低いから高い音に上るなら、罵ることになっちゃう。日本語なら、「半声調言語」の方は合ってるでしょう。同音語は音声輪郭で区別しますが、それは英語のイントネーションみたいなもので、中国語みたいほどの声調ではない。英語なら、声調は全然ないけど、声調みたいな部分もあるんでしょう。「赤いコート」といえば、赤いコートなら、19世紀の英国兵士で、赤いコートといえば、ただの赤い色のコートである。

Pronoun ・代名詞
English and Chinese have a reserved set of words that are exclusively used to refer to other things. This category of referent nouns are called “pronouns”. However, it has been argued that Japanese doesn’t have “true” pronouns, because each pronoun doubles as other words with specific meanings. For example, /anata/ (“you”; “thou”) can be used functionally as a pronoun, but also as a vocative for one’s spouse – “dearest”. Similarly, /kanojo/ (“she”; “her”) also doubles as the word for “girlfriend”. But even though Japanese does not have a specific word reserved for “aforementioned female human,” it does employ words to fit that syntactic gap, and in those instances, /kanojo/ works as a pronoun.
英語と中国語は特別なクラスの名詞があって、前後の人事を示して、「代名詞」と呼ばれるんだ。だけど、ある言語学者は日本語の代名詞は他の文脈で普通の名詞の役割で用いて、「純代名詞」がないといわれる。例えば、「あなた」は二人称のことを示すだけど、夫婦同士で、「愛しい者」とも示している。又、「彼女」も女性単数三人称を示しますが、「付き合っている女の子」の意味もありますので、代名詞として使うのみ言葉はないから、日本語は代名詞がないといわれます。でも、そうれはそうであっても、統語論上は代名詞が必要だったら、日本語は必ず代名詞として名詞を使えるから、少なくとも、代名詞の役割名詞があります。

As I’ve already mentioned, this is by no means an exhaustive analysis, but I hope my exposition has been helpful in illucidating some of the major characteristics of Chinese, Japanese, and English — and more importantly, that none of the three languages are more similar to any of the other two, but that rather, all three are quite unique.
上記も書かれましたが、これは徹底的な解析ではないけど、この解説は英語、日本語、と中国語の相違を少しだけでも得意とろこを表れていればよかったです。それに、どっちの方は他の二ヶ国語に似ていなくて、三ヶ国語は全て独特な言語である。

Advertisements